Connecticut state laws dating

Victims of family violence in Connecticut have the right to request relief from the abuse they are suffering in the form of a civil restraining order. § 46b-15 – Relief from physical abuse “Any family or household member, as defined in section 46b-38a, who has been subjected to a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury, stalking or a pattern of threatening, including, but not limited to, a pattern of threatening, as described in section 53a-62, by another family or household member may make an application to the Superior Court for relief under this section.” Criminal protective orders are made at the time of arraignment during a criminal proceeding. Victims must give 30 days notice to their landlord and satisfy certain requirements to prove they are a victim of family violence.

This court order will help protect you from further abuse and might include provisions such as requiring that your abuser leave the home or prohibiting your abuser from contacting you. Family Relations or the state's attorney often request protective orders.

At the time of their arrests (1961), Connecticut law made it a crime for any person to use a device or drug to prevent conception, and it was also a crime for any person to assist, abet, counsel, cause, or command another to do the same.

The defendants were found guilty of such assistance and fined 0 each.

46a-33a, including annual registration with DORS and submission of documented credentials, including certification by a nationally recognized board.

The state case was originally ruled in favour of the plaintiff, the state of Connecticut.

Estelle Griswold, the executive director of the Planned Parenthood League of Connecticut, and Lee Buxton, a physician and professor at Yale Medical School who served as Medical Director for the League, were convicted as accessories to the crime of providing married couples information about contraception and in some cases writing prescriptions for contraceptive devices for the woman.

In its judgment the Supreme Court ruled that Connecticut’s birth control law was unconstitutional based on rights set down in the Fourth and Fifth amendments that protect an individual’s home and private life from interference by the government.

Judging marriage to be a sacred and private bond that lies within a zone of privacy guaranteed by several provisions within the constitution, namely the concept of liberty implied in the Bill of Rights, the Court found that the original decision against Griswold and Buxton should be overturned, and that citizens in the state of Connecticut should enjoy the freedom to use birth control within the bonds of marriage.

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